1. nicoleanell:

    "It’s pretty tricky, right? I couldn’t even find the on button.”

    This was, I’m not kidding, the greatest use of this show’s time ever.

    (Source: idkgifss)

  2. theatlantic:

Before There Was the ‘Like’ Button There Was the ‘Radiovota’

The Like button is older than you think. Well, sort of. 
Back in the 1930s, Dr. Nevil Monroe Hopkins, a research engineer at NYU, had an idea: He wanted to allow consumers of the mass medium of the time—the radio—to offer feedback about the stuff they were hearing on their newfangled machines. He wanted people to be able to do what the average user of Facebook or Pandora or Instagram takes for granted today: to express pleasure at something. Or dissatisfaction, for that matter. Hopkins was looking for a way for people to vote about the stuff on their radios. Using their radios.
And thus was born … the “radiovota.” 
Read more. [Image: Radio-Craft Magazine via Gizmodo]

    theatlantic:

    Before There Was the ‘Like’ Button There Was the ‘Radiovota’

    The Like button is older than you think. Well, sort of. 

    Back in the 1930s, Dr. Nevil Monroe Hopkins, a research engineer at NYU, had an idea: He wanted to allow consumers of the mass medium of the time—the radio—to offer feedback about the stuff they were hearing on their newfangled machines. He wanted people to be able to do what the average user of Facebook or Pandora or Instagram takes for granted today: to express pleasure at something. Or dissatisfaction, for that matter. Hopkins was looking for a way for people to vote about the stuff on their radios. Using their radios.

    And thus was born … the “radiovota.”

    Read more. [Image: Radio-Craft Magazine via Gizmodo]

  3. trevorstmcgoodbody:

    The phenomenon of walking into a room and forgetting what you were about to do is also applicable to opening a new tab or closing an app.

  4. Respect others and if they have questions about Glass don’t get snappy. Be polite and explain what Glass does and remember, a quick demo can go a long way. In places where cell phone cameras aren’t allowed, the same rules will apply to Glass. If you’re asked to turn your phone off, turn Glass off as well. Breaking the rules or being rude will not get businesses excited about Glass and will ruin it for other Explorers.

    — The Google Glass Explorer docs • In a section titled “Don’t … Be creepy or rude (aka, a “Glasshole”).” (via shortformblog)

  5. Livestream’s styling of its streaming embed is incredibly, incredibly gorgeous.

    Livestream’s styling of its streaming embed is incredibly, incredibly gorgeous.

  6. Some highlights of Nexus TV:

    Less browsing, more watching

    Pick from personalized recommendations that appear automatically on your home screen.

    Start here, finish there

    Content syncs across Android devices so you can start a movie on your TV and finish it on your tablet in bed.

    Say what you want to see

    Just press the mic button and say “Gravity” to find it without having to dig through your media library.

  7. The Nexus 6 also includes one of Motorola’s Turbo Chargers, which can charge the phone back up to six hours worth of battery life in 15 minutes — so Google clearly wants you to be able to keep this thing going.

    — This is almost groundbreaking

    (Source: theverge.com)

  8. Interesting, well-animated, and interactive in-app interstitial ad for Honeywell’s Lyric thermostat.

    Side note: interstitial ads seem far less annoying on mobile than in the browser, possibly because the time for them to load and the time after dismissing the ad to load the next screen is much shorter.

  9. Nice UX of email unsubscription, though aesthetically displeasing.

  10. Android’s Android L campaign, or at least part of it.

    Droid Life says:

    Clearly, Google wants the world to know that everyone can use Android, not just nerds or elitists or hipsters or the rich or poor. It’s a platform with devices for everyone.

    (Source: droid-life.com)

  11. First time I’ve seen a startup do this, and frankly, it’s smart. Many startups could benefit from maintaining an inner circle of fans like this.

    First time I’ve seen a startup do this, and frankly, it’s smart. Many startups could benefit from maintaining an inner circle of fans like this.

  12. I’m sitting here in awe at how well priming worked in making me think $15 is a fantastic deal.

  13. I really appreciate The Verge’s fixed background ads. It’s nothing more than a fixed-position image with some z-index trickery, yet this is the first time in the history of digital ads that I’ve seen a media company find a way to do ads that are bold yet non-intrusive. It’s beautiful, simple, and fits within (and almost enhances) the reading flow. It’s very close in experience to ads in print publications, and works beautifully where Flipboard’s full-page ads never did.